Youth Employment


Recommendation Summary

  • Reform the PaTH model, Linking PaTH training to a job or experience outcome, and reward training providers who organise the work or experience.
  • Fund a trial a new PaTH model by offering long-term unemployed youth structured training concurrent to work experience using a traineeship style model. The experience can then be converted to a structured traineeship.

The level of youth unemployment remains unacceptably high. In a highly competitive marketplace, it is hard for young inexperienced workers to compete for jobs as they often perceived as taking longer to become productive contributors to the organisation. Prior to the introduction of PaTH, CCIQ was a strong advocate for an alternative to work for the dole where the unemployed could access experience in real work places. In that context, the announcement of the PaTH program was welcomed although the model we had put forward was not the one delivered. There is much that can be improved upon with the current model and also opportunities to trial the model in ways originally put forward by CCIQ and its members.

1. Reform the current PaTH model

The financial structures of the current PaTH model only provide a bare minimum for the employability training delivery and no reimbursement for any effort to secure job or internship outcomes. The system at the moment relies on the employment service provider to enter into commercial arrangements with PaTH training providers to share the financial incentives for placements. This may happen in the long term, but unless there is a change in the financial arrangements in the short to medium term, training providers will not be able to sustain assistance in finding job or placement outcomes. This needs to change or the “good” training providers will be lost to the system, leaving only those that are interested in delivering training on a fee for service basis.

It also leaves those training providers who have an interest in delivering the second block of training to potentially have a perverse disincentive to see the young person placed after the first block of training. It is critically important that PaTH training providers, where they are of industry or strongly connected to employers, are involved in the organisation of internships, work experiences and jobs. They are working with the young people for over three weeks and are well placed to identify the best match. The program needs to reward PaTH training providers for work and internship placements and job outcomes.

The Government also needs to ensure that the PaTH training is offered only when linked to an outcome. CCIQ has had a consistent policy position that the training offered through PaTH should only be offered to young people where there is an internship, work experience or job outcome available. As the system is continuing to use the training as a tool for mutual obligation, a great deal of the PaTH funding is being spent on training that has no outcomes for the young job seekers. Another mechanism needs to be found to achieve mutual obligation requirements so that the PaTH funding can be targeted to the delivery of training that achieves job or placement outcomes.

Policy Recommendation: 

  • Reform the PaTH model, linking PaTH training to a job or experience outcome, and reward training providers who organise the work or experience.

2. Trial an adaption of PaTH

CCIQ proposed a traineeship style arrangement, where the vocational training was concurrent to the work experience. This model embraced strongly embedded industry vocational training with units delivered from a certificate II or III traineeship by an RTO. The training could then be recognised should the experience convert to a traineeship, or at the least was relevant to ongoing work in the industry.

Policy Recommendation: 

  • Fund a trial a new PaTH model by offering long-term unemployed youth structured training concurrent to work experience using a traineeship style model. The experience can then be converted to a structured traineeship.